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fire cider

How to Prepare Horseradish

I first met Horseradish in junior high school. One of the classes I was taking put together a traditional Jewish Seder feast as one of our assignments and we were each assigned to bring one of the elements of the feast to the class so we could all learn more about what happens during a Seder. I’m not Jewish, so the whole experience was new to me then and I found it all quite fascinating. One of the dishes that is still most memorable to me from that day was the prepared Horseradish. I now use Horseradish in a variety of herbal recipes, including a traditional Fire Cider, but sometimes I like to prepare it on its own so I can use it in other dishes.

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Tip: Horseradish is rich in volatile oils that aren’t altogether pleasant (they’ll burn your nose if you accidentally stand over the Horseradish and inhale it after grating it), so it’s a good idea to prepare Horseradish with a window open. The longer you wait to add the vinegar to the recipe after grating the Horseradish, the stronger and sharper its taste (and aroma) will be.

To prepare Horseradish, peel one fresh root and grate or chop it into more manageable pieces. You can then use a food processor or blender (or a mortar and pestle) to puree the Horseradish.

Add 3 tablespoons of raw apple cider vinegar to each cup of Horseradish, along with about half a teaspoon of sea salt. Continue to puree until all of the ingredients are thoroughly incorporated.

Store the finished Horseradish recipe in an airtight container in the fridge where it should keep for at least one month. I like to add it to smashed potatoes and roasted vegetables, but you could also use it in sour cream as a flavorful dip for fresh veggies.

The Cherokee peoples have traditionally used Horseradish as an antirheumatic and diuretic, as a remedy for colds and to improve digestion. It is used in many herbal traditions as a catalyst herb, much the way Cayenne would be used, and is stimulating and energy-moving. When you first taste it, you might think it is a bit strong and possibly even off-putting, but you’ll probably find that it grows on you pretty quickly. I know it has for me!

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How do you like to enjoy Horseradish?

Much love,
Erin

 


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How to Make Fire Cider

Today is World Fire Cider Making Day, so we're joining the herbalists around the world in whipping up a batch of this fiery, stimulating traditional remedy. Ironically, I have a bit of a cold today, so please excuse my dry, scratchy, nasal-toned voice in the video. Apparently I didn't take my fire cider this season. ;)

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Each herbalist tends to take this traditional formula and play with the recipe a bit until it becomes their own, so you'll find a lot of variations of it in books and on the web. Ingredients tend to vary based on the location of the herbalist and which season it is. You'll notice that I've left out Horseradish root, one of the main ingredients in traditional fire cider, because I was unable to source it organically this year. (We're a 100% organic household.) No worries - use what you have available!

The main focus of the formula is to create a fiery, sweet immune boosting tonic that can be taken in small amounts when you feel like you might be getting sick or just need a little extra immune support. You can take it straight or add it to soups or salad dressings. Ready to make some of your own?

CLICK ON THE VIDEO BELOW TO PLAY IT

A BIT ABOUT THE HERBS

GARLIC

Most of you will recognize Garlic as the 'poor man's penicillin.' It's extremely valuable for fighting bacteria and helps boost the immune system by stimulating white blood cell production.

GINGER

Highly anti-inflammatory, Ginger also helps to soothe nausea.

TURMERIC

Another anti-inflammatory herb, Turmeric is often used to help support the body when dealing with coughs and colds.

ROSEMARY

Rosemary is uplifting and helps to relieve pain and ease headaches. It's also a circulatory stimulant.

THYME

Thyme is rich in immune-enhancing antioxidants and can be helpful for fighting infection.

CAYENNE

A warming herb that stimulates digestive enzymes and circulation, Cayenne is good for general aches and pains. It also contains capsaicin, which tells the brain to release the 'happy hormones' known as endorphins.

Enjoy your remedy-making!
Much love,
Erin

WHAT DO YOU LIKE TO ADD TO YOUR FIRE CIDER?
Let us know in the comments below.



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