.sqs-featured-posts-gallery {display: none ! important;}

calendula

Guide to Growing, Harvesting, Drying, and Using Calendula

If I made a list of the top 10 herbs I use the most in my apothecary and in the kitchen, Calendula would be right there near the top of the list. Her sunny little blooms fill the garden with vibrant cheer and I love working with her for both topical and internal applications. The fresh petals have a peppery taste that is delicious in baked goods and fresh salads, sprinkled in mashed potatoes, pressed into butter, and tossed with roasted veggies. The dried blooms are continuously infused into new batches of carrier oil in my apothecary for use in skin care blends and medicinal salves. I’m distilling a lot of Calendula this year so I can use the hydrosol more because it’s lovely as well. The flowers are a staple in my herbal foot bath blends and teas. This versatile plant is so easy to grow yourself, so I highly encourage you to plant out a few packets of seed if you haven’t added it to your garden yet.

the-complete-guide-to-growing,-harvesting,-drying-and-using-calendula-aromaculture.png

I'm right in the middle of a Calendula trial right now, so Calendula is definitely at the forefront of my mind. I'm testing over 30 different varieties for vigor, floriferousness (not a word), and medicinal quality for a project that I'm working on, so I'm definitely knee deep in working with this pretty little plant. It's truly one of the most used in my apothecary!

GROWING CALENDULA

Calendula is grown as a hardy annual in most growing zones and as a perennial in a couple of the warmest zones. Back in southern California, I could definitely grow it as a perennial, but even here in the PNW, it kept right on blooming through the frosts and the snow we had over the winter. I've heard reports of it not overwintering well in areas that get a lot more snow (and much colder temps) than we do, but the plants that I left in the ground last fall kept right on flowering and are still going while my new seed-grown batch is just starting to produce more heavily!

Calendula loves to be grown in full sun and will produce the highest yields when planted in the brightest areas of your garden. Well-drained soil is a plus and it seems to thrive when I add lots of compost to the soil before planting and a layer of mulch just after transplanting.

Plant your seeds in seed boxes or propagation trays, covering them with about ¼” of soil and water in well. You can direct sow the seeds, but planting them up in trays first will give you a head start on the growing season so you can start harvesting blooms sooner. It also gives you an opportunity to provide an early food source for the pollinators, which love this plant. Mine are consistently visited by at least 7 different kinds of bees, among other things.

Once your plants have well developed root systems and are ready to be planted out, you can space them about a foot apart throughout the garden. I’ve found that dedicated Calendula beds are strikingly beautiful, but I also plant them throughout my vegetable beds in between plants to draw pollinators to the food plants. If it will overwinter in your area, consider giving the plants even more room in their beds because they'll grow to be quite a bit larger than plants grown as annuals and will need more space. 16-18" would be good.

HARVESTING CALENDULA

Once flowers start opening, you’ll want to harvest at least every 2 to 3 days, but I’ve found myself harvesting daily during its peak blooming time. Pick the flowers the day they are fully open and leave a few for the bees, but make sure that you deadhead the flowers you leave behind before they go to seed to keep your plants happily producing throughout the season.

I like to pull or snip the flower heads right off into my gathering tray and then come back through and trim the stems down on the plant later. Your hands will get sticky from the resins in the involucre of the flower heads (the green bracts on the bottom of the flower head). Most of the time, the sticky residue will wash right off with soap and water once you're finished harvesting, but you can also use a little bit of olive oil (or any fatty oil) if necessary for stubborn bits.

DRYING CALENDULA

Calendula flowers are best dried in a single layer on screens in a warm area away from direct sun with excellent air flow. The blooms are thick (the flower centers, especially), so it’s important to make sure that all of the moisture is gone out of the blossoms before storing them. Make sure you check the flowers after about a week of drying time and if there is any moisture left in the center of the blooms, let them dry longer. Some folks like to use fans in their drying room when they process their Calendula to help speed the process along, but for home-sized batches, I haven’t needed them. If you’re in a humid area, though, fans might be a good idea.

Where I live, Calendula may even take 2-3 weeks to dry completely in the center, so be patient. It's better to wait to get them in your jars than to spoil a whole batch because of leftover moisture in some of the blooms.

USING CALENDULA

Once your blossoms are completely dried, they can be used in:

  • herbal butters
  • herbal vinegars and salad dressings
  • tinctures
  • glycerites
  • syrups
  • compresses and poultices
  • herbal oils
  • salves, balms and ointments
  • lotions and creams
  • kitchen recipes (both sweet and savory)
  • herbal tea blends
  • bath tea blends
  • skin care recipes
  • and more!

Calendula is especially suited to applications for the skin (it's full of skin-healing and skin-protective compounds), mucous membranes, and the digestive tract, so keep that in mind when formulating with it. You can read more about making herbal oils with Calendula flower heads here and I also have a post about some of my favorite ways to use Calendula here.

Once you start growing Calendula, you’ll probably find yourself planting increasingly more of it each year. It’s such an irresistible and usable plant!

How about you? Do you grow Calendula?

Much love,
Erin

THE COMPLETE GUIDE TO GROWING HARVESTING DRYING AND USING CALENDULA FLOWERS.jpg

MORE BLOG POSTS

7 Things to Make with Calendula Flower Heads

Calendula might be the sunniest little flower in the garden (well, maybe apart from Sunflowers). When it starts blooming, that vibrant, eye-catching color is noticeable from the next street over and the pollinators love it. My plants are always buzzing with happy little critters flitting about and spinning webs. The Calendula bed is a lively, cheerful spot to spend a morning reading or just breathing in the spring air.

When my Calendula starts blooming, it goes to town quickly. Have your harvesting baskets ready, because you’ll probably be able to gather quite a few flowers each day while still leaving enough to feed the pollinators. When your drying racks are full of flowers and you’re wondering what to do with some of them, here are some ideas.

7-things-to-make-with-calendula-flower-heads.png

Infused oils

Calendula infused oil is one of the most versatile carriers to keep in your apothecary. It’s great for virtually every kind of skin issue and is wonderful in moisturizing recipes during those gray wintery days and the dry heat of the summer. Use it to make salves, balms, lotions and creams, serums and body oils. If I had to choose only 5 oils to keep for my apothecary each year, Calendula infused oil would be at the top of the list.

photo by Erin Stewart wm-38.jpg

Hydrosol

You don’t have to have a fancy still to make hydrosol. You can make it with just a stock pot, a large bowl (or even a wok), a steaming rack, a Pyrex measuring bowl, and some plant material. There are plenty of tutorials available online, but let me just say that the process is simple, non-intimidating, and easy and by the time you’re finished, you’ll have some beautiful Calendula hydrosol that you can use as a facial toner or as an ingredient in lotions and creams!

Steam Blends

I love to add Calendula to my facial steam blends. I pair it with other herbs based on what my skin needs at the moment, but one popular mixture I use a lot includes Rose petals, Lavender buds, Chamomile flowers and Rosemary leaves. Steep the herb mixture, covered, in a bowl as a strong tea, then allow the steam from the bowl to open your pores. Your skin will thank you!

Hand and Foot Baths

We like hand and foot baths around here. Maurice Messegue’s books were some of the first herbal books that I ever read and ever since then, I’ve been in love with this herbal application method. It’s so relaxing, but I also get to reap the benefits of all the beautiful herbs that I use. Calendula almost always makes it into my hand and foot bath recipes. Steep the herbs you choose as a strong tea, then pour the whole bowl into a basin or tub large enough to cover your hands or feet past the ankle/wrist joints. Add enough hot/warm water to the basin to cover your ankles/wrists, then sit back and relax for at least 8-10 minutes. I like to keep a hand towel near me, so I can easily dry off when I’m done. A bottle of moisturizing lotion and a pair of cozy socks turn it into a luxurious skin treatment as well.

Lip Balm

Calendula lip balm is perfect for soothing chapped or irritated lips. Infuse your carrier oil of choice with the dried flowers for 4-6 weeks, then add a bit of beeswax and Cocoa butter, pour into tins or tubes, and you have a skin-nourishing balm ready to apply.

Tip: Use wider tubes to make an easy-to-apply version for other skin irritation issues like bites and stings.

After-Sun Spray

When I know I’m going to be spending the day in the sun, I like to whip up a 0.5 to 1 ounce spray bottle of skin-soothing spray to take with me. I usually use Aloe vera juice or gel (the kind you get from the nutrition section of the store that is meant for internal use) as my base and allow dried Calendula flowers to infuse in the Aloe while I’m getting ready. Strain, pour into a spray bottle, and take it with you on your day trip to have a ready-to-use after sun spray.

Note: Because this is an Aloe-based product, it has a very short shelf life. It may last 2 or 3 days in the fridge, but shouldn’t used after that. It’s best to make a fresh batch whenever you need it.

Add Fresh Petals to Food

Nothing looks quite as sunny on your salad, shortbread or biscuits as fresh Calendula petals! Sprinkle them in generously to enjoy their peppery flavor.

How do you like to use your Calendula flowers?

Much love,
Erin

7 THINGS TO MAKE WITH CALENDULA FLOWER HEADS.jpg

MORE BLOG POSTS

Puppy Paws Foot Pad Salve

Are you a dog person? A cat person? An all-around animal lover (that's me)? One of the many great things about being an herbalist is that my pup gets to enjoy all of the yumminess of dog-appropriate homegrown, health supportive herbs along with us. Since this month’s issue of AromaCulture Magazine is focusing on the subject of herbal / aromatic care for our furry friends, I thought it would only be fitting to include an article or two about using herbs with pups here on the blog!

This recipe is my go-to when our German Shepherd steps on a thorn or scuffs the pads of her feet somehow. It very rarely happens, but for those moments that it does, it’s a handy recipe to keep on hand for her. I like to keep it in my bag when we're out hiking and foraging just in case it's needed. It's people-friendly too, so it's a great multi-purpose recipe for your first aid kit.

This recipe is excerpted from the May 2018 Issue of AromaCulture Magazine.

how-to-make-puppy-paws-foot-pad-salve-for-dogs-aromaculture.png

Ingredients:

  • 4 parts Calendula infused oil
  • 2 parts Plantain leaf infused oil (Plantago major)
  • 1 part beeswax

To Make:

Melt the beeswax over low heat using the double boiler method, then stir in the herb-infused oils. Remove from the heat, pour into tins or jars, add your label, and stash a jar in your pup first aid kit or apothecary so you’ll have it available when it’s needed.

Tips for Use:

Spray the pads of your pup’s feet with diluted Lavender or Yarrow hydrosol before gently massaging a small amount of the salve into the pads of the foot.

I like to leave essential oils out of this recipe, especially for puppies. The essential oils aren’t needed to make the salve effective and since dogs will naturally lick their feet, especially if they’re bothering them, it’s just a good idea to leave them out.

What else do you keep in your pup’s first aid kit?

Much love,
Erin

HOW TO MAKE PUPPY PAWS FOOT PAD SALVE AROMACULTURE.jpg

MORE BLOG POSTS

Top 11 Herbs and Essential Oils for the Skin

Walking down the skincare aisle at the drugstore is sort of amusing to me. Shelves and shelves of products with pretty packaging, clinical claims, and long lists of synthetic, chemical-laden ingredients...they don't appeal to me at all anymore, but they do cause me to ponder the reasons our culture tends to so easily buy into their marketing. Before I transitioned to a chemical-free lifestyle, I tried so many different storebought products to try to force my skin into looking vibrant and glowy and clear, but none of them worked long-term and many of them even caused irritation or damage to my sensitive skin. When I started using homemade, botanical products instead of the options offered to me at the local Nordstrom, Target, or CVS, I saw such a drastic improvement in my skin (and my health) that it's hard for me to even fathom picking up a toxin-laden, though prettily packaged, product again.

Since June is Skin Healing month here at AromaCulture, I decided to reserve some blog space to talk about my favorite herbs and essential oils for the skin. All of the botanicals in this post are well suited to a wide variety of skincare and first aid applications and can be used for every skin type. They're perfect ingredients to include in your own skincare formulations. Ready to see what made my Top 11 list?

1. DANDELION

So much of the skin's health depends on what is actually happening on the inside of your body. If your liver and kidneys are not functioning well or your digestive system and circulation are a bit stagnant or your gut health is not quite where it should be, you'll start to notice changes in your skin. Acne, blackheads, irritation, inflammation, dull skin...these are all outward manifestations of an inner imbalance that needs to be addressed. Dandelion (Taraxacum officinale)  is one of the best herbs for this. It supports the health of the digestive organs, especially the liver (which is directly related to the health of your skin), and helps the body to purify the blood and flush out the yuck that doesn't belong. Any time I start to notice little spots popping up on my face, I know it's time to bring out the Dandelion. My skin thanks me every time.

Dandelion can be utilized for the skin via digestive bitters, herbal hand and foot baths, or through the diet. The whole plant is edible. Flowers can be added to salads, roots can be added to soups, and the greens can be cooked down with something sweet and eaten like any other edible green. (The younger leaves are better tasting than older ones.) Generally, the leaves are used as a diuretic (think stagnant issues, like cellulite) and the root is used to stimulate digestion and the production of bile, supporting the liver (and, therefore, the skin). The root can be roasted and brewed as a coffee substitute and is often included in homemade root beer formulas.

If you have a latex allergy, you will probably want to avoid Dandelion. That milky white sap that you see when you pick a Dandelion is latex.

 
 

2. BURDOCK

Burdock (Arctium lappa) is another liver-supportive herb that will indirectly improve and support the health of the skin. It works to correct the internal imbalances that manifest themselves outwardly via issues with the skin (i.e. dandruff, eczema, psoriasis, dry skin, etc.) and is also valuable when used externally for scalp health, wounds, rashes, and inflamed areas. It's great at getting the lymph moving, too, so is again indicated where there is stagnation. My favorite herbal shampoo includes Burdock root as a main ingredient. It can be infused into a carrier oil and included in first aid preparations and skin care formulas or can be decocted and used as a wash. Burdock can also be taken internally as a tincture or as a food. The root is often cooked and eaten as a dish called Gobo and it can also be brewed into a tea and included in homemade root beer soda blends.

Burdock is a weedy plant, so it's extremely easy to grow yourself. Start a little patch of it (it'll do well in just about any kind of soil) and harvest the root in early fall. There are no known safety issues for Burdock.

3. CALENDULA

Ah, Calendula. Possibly the herb supreme for skincare formulas. This sunny little bloom is chock-full of flavanoids and carotenoids that help to heal the skin. Calendula (Calendula officinalis) is indicated for everything from acne to wounds and helps to reduce inflammation and promote cell repair. It's one of the easiest herbs to grow in the garden and will start blooming in early spring and last until well after the first frost if you keep cutting the stems throughout the growing season. Harvest seeds in the fall or winter to save for the next year's growth.

Use Calendula for the skin by infusing the dried blooms into carrier oils for skincare formulations. It can also be brewed as a tea and used as a compress, wash, or poultice (or taken internally). The hydrosol is lovely on its own or included as an ingredient in cream formulas. The tincture can also be used in some cases, though it may be drying when used externally. Calendula also produces a lovely CO2 extract which can be incorporated into topical blends.

 
 

4. COMFREY

Comfrey (Symphytum uplandica or Symphytum officinale) seems such a happy plant to me. It contentendly pops its first little leaves out of the soil in early spring and sets right to work filling its plot with cheerful green. It may be one of the fastest growing, most resilient plants in my herb garden. Comfrey is one of those botanicals that herbalists just love. It has an incredible affinity for healing the skin and has such pronounced wound healing properties that it's earned the nickname "knitbone" because it is said to 'knit' wounded tissues back together. Rich in the skin-healing and protective component, allantoin, it's often included in first aid formulas and skin care preparations. Infuse the leaves into carrier oil or Aloe to use in blends or use an infusion / tea as a wash. Comfrey can also be utilized as a compress or poultice.

5. LAVENDER

No list of skin-healing herbs would be complete without Lavender. There are many varieties of Lavender products available on the market, but you'll want to look for Lavandula angustifolia for skin-healing purposes. The herb, essential oil, hydrosol, and infused carrier oils are all useful for skin preparations. Most folks who are even the slightest bit interested in herbs and essential oils are familiar with Lavender, so I won't expound too thoroughly on it here, but do know that it can be included in just about every herbal / aromatherapeutic product you ever make for the skin without seeming out of place. Aside from its own contribution to the therapeutic effects of the blend, it seems to marry together all of the other ingredients you choose to include to create a more potent synergy.

Lavender is another easy-to-grow herb that will do fine in well drained soils to a zone 5. In cooler areas, it can be grown in a pot and brought in during the colder months. We're growing about a dozen varieties this year and it hasn't taken me long to decide that it's my favorite herb to grow. There's nothing quite so lovely and delightful as this sweet plant!

Infuse Lavender buds into carrier oils, Aloes, and honeys. Use the tea as a wash. The herb can be used as a compress or poultice. The hydrosol is lovely on its own as a facial toner or body spray or as an ingredient in creams. The essential oil can be added to most any skin care or first aid formula.

 
 

6. ST. JOHN'S WORT

Who doesn't love this sunny little plant? The St. John's Wort used for skincare is Hypericum perforatum, which can be easily identified by the little "holes" in its leaves. When you hold a leaf up to the sunlight, you'll see little dark specks (or perforations) on it. The top 4-6" of the blooming plant is used. The plant is ready to harvest when the buds produce a reddish-purple stain on your fingers when you press them. If you don't see this stain, you're either too early or too late. Watch your patch closely when the weather starts to turn toward summery temperatures near the end of June - the perfect harvesting window is short! Some will be ready and some won't. If you're unable to gather enough in one harvesting session, check back every day or two for the next week to see if more flowers are ready to be collected.

St. John's Wort can be infused into carrier oil (it will turn a bright, deep red color as the flowers release their medicinal properties into the oil) that can be used in both first aid and skin care blends. It's useful for external wounds, burns, cuts, bruises, areas of trauma, and inflammatory complaints and helps to speed recovery. Some folks include it in preparations for shingles or herpes. It's excellent for helping to relieve pain as well, so it's often used in massage oils for sore muscles or injuries.

Some people experience photosensitivity when using St. John's Wort, so be aware of any areas of your skin that will be exposed to direct sunlight after applying. If you experience any sort of rash or discomfort, stop using it.

7. HELICHRYSUM

Helichrysum (Helichrysum italicum) is probably most known for its lovely, skin-healing, anti-aging essential oil. It's pricey, but oh so lovely and effective. It helps to speed recovery of wounds and is often used in first aid applications. It's also excellent in anti-aging skincare products and posh facial creams. One well-known brand uses it in their fancy hand creams and another in their makeup products.

The hydrosol is wonderful for use as a facial toner or body spray and can also be used in herbal creams. A teaspoon of it can be added to a luxurious bath (or hand or foot bath).

The herb itself can be infused into carrier oils or brewed as a tea for use as a wash. It's beneficial for a wide variety of skin ailments, including acne and eczema.

 
 

8. PLANTAIN

Plantain (Plantago spp.) is another weed-like plant that grows along the trodden path; it likes to follow human footsteps and spring up right where it is most likely to be needed. It's a skin-soothing herb that's especially great for skin irritations like bug bites and stings. Just the other day, I was planting out some new herb transplants into my garden and something decided to bite me. The swelling, itching, and burning reaction didn't seem too bad at first so I carried on with what I was doing, but within a few minutes, the bite had turned into quite a painful welt. I walked over to my bed of Plantain, picked one of the leaves, crushed it with my fingers and rubbed it over the area. I then used a fresh leaf, also crushed, to lay over the area as an herbal bandaid (it will stick on its own if you've crushed it). Within a few minutes, the itching and burning had stopped and when the leaf naturally fell off 15 or 20 minutes later, the Plantain had completed its job. I couldn't even tell where the bite had been.

 
 

Plantain can be used in a carrier oil or Aloe for first aid and skin care preparations to soothe and reduce inflammation and irritation and can also be taken internally as a tea (or used externally as a wash) for other issues.

 
 

9. ROSE

Rose (Rosa spp.) can be utilized in its every form for delightful, luxurious skin formulas. More ideas for ways to do that here and here. They contain anti-inflammatory and antibacterial compounds (which suit acne-prone skin), are rich in anti-aging properties, and are known to nourish, hydrate, and even help tone and rejuvenate the skin

Rose petals, Rose hydrosol, Rosehip seed oil, Rose flower essence, and precious Rose essential oil are all derived from this one generous plant. I like to incorporate her into every step of my own skincare routine.

Rose essential oil is also beneficial for wounds when there has been trauma. It will not only help with speeding the recovery of the skin, but will also comfort the heart and mind and work to bring stability back to the person affected.

 
 

10. CARROT SEED

Carrot Seed (Daucus carota) is available both as an essential oil and as a CO2 and an infused carrier oil. All are beneficial for the skin. It's one of those plants that's also beneficial for the liver and is helpful for releasing blocked energy, so we know it's going to be amazing for our skin! Include it in topical blends for a variety of skin ailments, including eczema, psoriasis, acne, and other inflammatory, irritated conditions. It's also useful for anti-aging skincare products and can be used in carrier oils, creams, and facial steams.

Avoid use when pregnant.

11. MARSHMALLOW

Marshmallow (Althaea officinalis) leaf and root are both used for skin and hair formulas (root is more commonly used, but the leaf can also be used). It's rich in flavanoids, polysaccharides, and beta-carotene and is mucilaginous, making it skin-soothing and anti-inflammatory. You can infuse the root into a carrier oil or Aloe to use in a blend or you can prepare a decoction and use it as a poultice or wash. It blends well with Chamomile tea for this purpose as well. It's effective for a variety of ailments, including eczema, burns, and wounds, and will help to moisten dry skin. Powdered root can be included in homemade baby powder blends.

12. YARROW

I couldn't choose just 11 after all! Yarrow (Achillea millefolium) is so useful in the herbal first aid kit that I felt it had to be included in this list. The leaves are styptic and antiseptic and can be powdered and used in styptic powder recipes or used fresh when needed. All of the aerial parts of the plant can be used to help speed healing of wounds, burns, and other skin ailments. The foliage is light and feathery and the flowers are lovely; it's easy to grow from seed (perennial) and the pollinators love it. Look for the white or pink flowering varieties if you want to use the herb medicinally. The yellow flowering varieties are ornamental. Use the herb in hand and foot baths, washes, and compresses to help reduce inflammation and speed healing.

I've used Yarrow hydrosol as a styptic in a pinch and it seems to be just as effective as the herb itself, at least for minor cases. It can also be used as a facial toner or as an ingredient in creams. The essential oil is antispasmodic, anti-inflammatory, and analgesic. Include it in blends for your first aid kit to help with the pain and swelling associated with injury. For skin-care, it can be a useful ingredient for irritated, inflamed skin complaints.
 

WHICH HERBS AND/OR ESSENTIAL OILS WOULD YOU ADD TO THIS LIST?
LET ME KNOW IN THE COMMENTS BELOW.

Much love,
Erin

How to Make an Herbal Face Toner with Garden Plants

There's a glorious, untouched field full of wild herbs and edibles across from our home. My husband and I love to take our pup out there to run around, forage, and spend time with plants. We have a bit of a joke in our family that our dog is a canine herbalist - she seems to always be drawn to aromatic herbs. Back in California, one of our neighbors had some large Lavender plants bordering her picket fence and every time we'd pass her house on our walks, our sweet little pup would have to stop to smell those Lavender bushes for a moment. (Smart dog!)

One of the herbs that's abundant in the field here, especially near the frequently trodden bits, is Plantain. It's so lush and vibrant and, on a recent walk through the field, I felt like it wanted to be made into something lovely. So I harvested a bit, brought it home, and whipped up a new batch of facial toner (among other things). Skin care products are some of my favorite formulas to develop and I'm really loving this one at the moment. I hope you enjoy it!

The herbs in this recipe can be interchanged with whatever skin-nourishing plants you have on hand. These just happen to be what I was drawn to when I was making this batch. I've been really keen on garden herbs lately (perhaps because all of the little seedlings I've been nurturing and planting out have me dreaming of summer blooms), so I've included many of them in this recipe.

I've also included a bit of organic liquid chlorophyll in the recipe. I saw a bottle of it in our local healthfood store that was made from organic alfalfa awhile back and it intrigued me, so I picked up a bottle to experiment with in topical formulations. Liquid chlorophyll is said to be incredibly skin healing, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory when used topically.

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 part Plantain leaves
  • 1 part Nettles
  • 1 part Burdock root
  • 1 part Calendula flowers
  • 1 part Rose petals
  • Aloe vera juice (the kind meant for internal use without all of the added junk) or raw, organic Apple cider vinegar
  • liquid Chlorophyll

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Combine equal parts of all of the herbs you're going to use in your formula. Infuse the herbs in organic, raw Apple cider vinegar for several weeks (4-6), then strain the herbs out of the liquid and send them to the compost pile. Alternatively, you can infuse the herbs in Aloe vera juice for 20-30 minutes instead. The product will have a much shorter shelf life (think herbal tea) and will be best kept in the fridge, but Aloe vera boasts a plethora of skin-healing therapeutic properties in itself and is well worth using in skincare formulas.
     
  2. Pour the strained liquid into a sterilized spray bottle and add a couple of drops of liquid chlorophyll. Shake well.
     
  3. To use, spray an organic cotton pad (or washcloth) with Aloe vera juice (if you're using a vinegar infusion), then spray the same cotton pad with your herbal vinegar. Swipe the pad across the skin of your face and neck, then follow up with your favorite herbal serum or cream.

I hope you enjoy the recipe! If you decide to give it a go, leave a comment below to let me know how you like it.

Much love,
Erin

MAY'S MAGAZINE ISSUE IS NOW AVAILABLE!