about aromaculture

AromaCulture Magazine is an educational magazine for aromatherapists, herbalists, and those who just love and/or want to learn more about therapeutic plants and essential oils. Digital issues are published every month and include educational articles, case studies and recipes from professional herbalists, aromatherapists, and other experts in the holistic health industry. You can purchase individual issues (including past issues) from the shop or subscribe to the magazine to have it automatically delivered to your email inbox every month. Magazine subscribers receive a discount and a bonus essential oil or herb profile with every issue! We also have an educational blog that's packed with great information.


meet the team

 

Erin Stewart is an herbalist, NAHA certified aromatherapist, and organic gardener. She grows over 70 kinds of aromatic and medicinal plants for her own apothecary and distills essential oils and hydrosols in her PNW garden. Her Lavender collection boasts over 90 different varieties. Erin is also an artist and photographer and is a professional member of NAHA, OLA, and USLGA. You can find her articles about herbs and aromatherapy in select issues of AromaCulture Magazine and here on our blog.

Erin is committed to teaching her students about using herbs in their many different forms, including aromatherapy products like hydrosols and essential oils, in a way that is effective, safe and sustainable, from the seed to the apothecary.

 
 

Jonathan Stewart is an organic gardener, artisan woodworker, and herbalist. He is the host of AromaCulture's Herbs & Oils Podcast and works alongside our magazine contributors to develop high quality, educational content for AromaCulture Magazine. Jon grows herbs and edibles alongside Erin in their organic garden and enjoys teaching our students about supporting health and wellbeing, sustainable woodworking for the organic garden, and growing and using herbs effectively.

 
My idea of a good herbalist isn’t someone who knows the uses of forty different herbs, but someone who knows how to use one herb in forty different ways.
— Svevo Brooks